About

My name is Sandy Wang. I am simultaneously a student, a designer, and a Canadian. Not too many people outside of the provincial boarders know about Burnaby, so I tell people I live in Vancouver.

This is my third attempt at maintaining a blog.

Search for content


Reblogged from caner-about-town

urbanpaysan:

The German city of Hamburg has announced an ambitious plan to create, and link, an amazing 27 square miles of new and existing green space all over the city. The plan, called the "Green Network," will effectively remove all cars from the city centre and promote cycling and public transport - and it is planned to be in place by 2034.

If fully realised, the network will cover some 7000 hectares, over half the size of Boston or San Francisco. 

visicert:

SHIPWRECK BOUNDARIES
portland bill, dorset
scale 1:30,000
Charting shipwrecks across the Portland coast, the map identifies the significance between the sea floor formations and the shipwreck locations. Linking the shipwrecks to Portland Bill and the edge of the Portland Ledge creates boundaries in which interventions can be placed, primarily within a 01km radius of the points.

visicert:

SHIPWRECK BOUNDARIES

portland bill, dorset

scale 1:30,000

Charting shipwrecks across the Portland coast, the map identifies the significance between the sea floor formations and the shipwreck locations. Linking the shipwrecks to Portland Bill and the edge of the Portland Ledge creates boundaries in which interventions can be placed, primarily within a 01km radius of the points.

(Source: rosieseamandesign)


Reblogged from landscapeunhinged

Reblogged from wilderbahn

kateoplis:

NPR covers all 2,428 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border, so you don’t have to.

The results are beautiful.


Reblogged from caner-about-town

ryanpanos:

Totem Pole Playground | Kilian Schönberger

Surreal photographic approach: Snowy and foggy conditions transform this high rope course in a otherworldly scenery. The aim was to capture this profane location in a manner that is based on the atmosphere of the totem pole garden on Vancouver Island / Canada.


Reblogged from staceythinx

mymodernmet:

Photos of an ice cave reached by crossing a frozen Lake Superior, taken by Brian Peterson and Andy Rathbun.

See more on My Modern Met.


Reblogged from npr

wetheurban:

ART: Abstract Geometric Reflections by Victoria Siemer

Don’t you just love good design work? Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York.

Read More


Reblogged from npr

wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Nick Meek Photographs Costa Rica Covered in 8 Mil. Flowers Petals for Sony

Imagine a landscape swirling with millions of flower petals. This might sound like something out of a fairy tale, but it really happened.

Read More


Reblogged from cjwho

cjwho:

house for mother, linköping, sweden by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) | via

‘house for mother’ by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF), is located in linköping, sweden, and is part of the linköpingsbo 2017 housing exhibition. the dwelling is divided into two parallel volumes slightly shifted from each other, thus creating spaces both in front of and behind the building. oriented to a park in the north, and an alley in the south, the two adjacent gables emphasize the overall theme for the area in general: narrow plots and a variation of housing types.

the first form contains the kitchen, dining room and living room, with the bathroom and laundry room housed in a smaller cabin within the structure. the second volume, partly in two levels with a less inclined roof, accommodates the bedrooms and a small studio. the façades and roof are covered with raw, corrugated aluminum in juxtaposition to the warm interior with an exposed timber structure and walls lined with plywood. the polished concrete flooring folds up along the perimeter of the building and transforms into a bench and shelf.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe


Reblogged from humanscalecities

urbangeographies:

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CITIES: Neuroscience and urban planning

More than three decades ago, New York City asked pioneering urbanist William Whyte to unravel the mysteries of public space. Why do some such spaces attract crowds of happy visitors while others remain barren and empty?

Conducted with stopwatches, time-lapse videography, and simple paper charts, Whyte’s research was a spectacular success. Based on this findings, he made a series of common-sensical and easily implemented recommendations, which the city soon incorporated into its municipal construction codes.

Whyte suggested that the way to build a psychologically healthy city lay in careful observation, collection of clear data, and willingness to challenge preconceptions. Whyte’s book on The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces, and the short film based on this work, remain fresh and insightful today. They still are required reading and viewing for any student of urban life.

If Whyte’s fundamental guidelines for urban field research remain current, it is also true that new technologies are now available to those who study the workings of the urban realm. Now we can go well beyond simple observations of the overt behavior of city dwellers. We can look inside the bodies and minds of those who inhabit urban spaces.

To explore the old and new techniques of urban field research, see this article from The Guardian, which includes a short video of innovative urban methodologies. 


Reblogged from conceptlandscape

arciphilia:

mindyourgarden:

The Twisted Valley

The twisted valley aims to recover the pedestrian’s traffic footprint. Since the channeling works that were made in the 70s definitely skewed Elche’s Canyon continuity. 

by Grupo Aranea

(via

Reblogged from ryanpanos

ryanpanos:

Gypsum | Gleb Simonov

Because gypsum dissolves over time in water, gypsum is rarely found in the form of sand. However, the unique conditions of the White Sands National Monument in the US state of New Mexico have created a 710 km2 (270 sq mi) expanse of white gypsum sand, enough to supply the construction industry with drywall for 1,000 years. Commercial exploitation of the area, strongly opposed by area residents, was permanently prevented in 1933 when president Herbert Hoover declared the gypsum dunes a protected national monument.


Reblogged from cjwho

cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

ow-works:

thepapercity:

one of the very early in progress drawings from my thesis work… watch this space! 
to quote Owain Williams (http://www.ow-works.co.uk/) from an email exchange last year - “ there is no shame in drawing your guts out before you are certain how your plan is arranged” - great advice! 

very fine draftsmanship 

ow-works:

thepapercity:

one of the very early in progress drawings from my thesis work… watch this space! 

to quote Owain Williams (http://www.ow-works.co.uk/) from an email exchange last year - “ there is no shame in drawing your guts out before you are certain how your plan is arranged” - great advice! 

very fine draftsmanship 


Reblogged from ow-works

Reblogged from npr

npr:

Photos courtesy of Alejandro D’Acosta and Claudia Turrent

"The Hippest Winery In Mexico Is Made Of Recycled Boats"

Architects Alejandro D’Acosta and Claudia Turrent have carved a niche designing stunning, upscale wineries and other buildings in Baja.They specialize in finding uses for offbeat, reclaimed material. 


Reblogged from lustik

lustik:

It started with a dime - Marjet Wessels Boer via Domus.

Brickwork and water jet cut aluminum
Mauritskade, Amsterdam
Commissioner: Woonstichting The Key
Art Advisor: Marieke Gerritsen
Photo’s: Hans Peter Föllmi / Marjet Wessels Boer

Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy